8 Error Types to prepare for SAT

8 Must-Know Error Types for SAT Language Section

In the SAT Language section, your grammar skills are tested. Therefore, to achieve a better score, you need to be very good at grammar. You should practice well and master the grammatical skill. One should know all the existing error types to prepare for SAT.

Again practicing Grammar is not easy therefore you can take help from your teachers or an institute. SAT Coaching Centers in Chandigarh have proven to provide the best training that will help you improve your grammar.

8 Error Types to prepare for SAT

Given are some common grammatical errors that you must practice in order to score well.

1. Subject-Verb agreement

Agreement or concord happens when a word changes form depending on the other words to which it relates. It is an instance of inflection, and usually involves making the value of some grammatical category “agree” between varied words or parts of the sentence.

INCORRECT:    Jim runs toward the park.

CORRECT: Jim and Charlie run towards the park.

2. Collective nouns are singular

Collective nouns represent a group of nouns as one. Many test-takers mistake the collective nouns for being plural because they represent a group. This is a common mistake made by most people. Always remember that the collective nouns represents a group as one, therefore, it is singular.

INCORRECT:   The fleet are ready to sail

CORRECT: The fleet is ready to sail

3. Prepositional phrases do not make a subject singular or plural

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.

INCORRECT: The book of five chapters are beautifully written.

CORRECT:     The book of five chapters is beautifully written.

4. Pronoun reference must be clear

Pronoun reference is the practice of making pronouns refer clearly to the words they replace. A pronoun takes the place of a noun; thus, the pronoun must agree with the noun it replaces in number and person. Also, it must be clear which noun the pronoun is substituting for.

INCORRECT:   John, Jim and Carl were running when he got tired and stopped.

CORRECT:   John, Jim and Carl were running when Jim got tired and stopped.

5. Misplaced and dangling modifiers

A misplaced modifier is a word, phrase, or clause that is improperly separated from the word it modifies/ describes. Because of separation, sentences with this error often sound awkward, ridiculous, or confusing. Furthermore, they can be downright illogical.

INCORRECT: The dealer sold the Cadillac to the buyer with leather seats.

CORRECT:   The dealer sold the Cadillac with leather seats to the buyer.

6. Sensible sentence

The vocabulary section is no longer present in the SAT test. This means you do not have to spend hours to memorize difficult words each day. But, you still need to have understanding of some words so that you make sensible sentences. You must learn some tricky words like homophones because they appear as a challenge to check your understanding of words.

INCORRECT: There are many dogs here without there collars.

CORRECT:  There are many dogs here without their collars.

7. Commas in clauses

A sentence consists of a subject and a predicate in other words, a noun and a verb phrase. A clause is by definition the building block of a sentence. For a sentence to be complete, it must have at least one main clause and the clauses must be connected with proper punctuation.

INCORRECT: Pandas are my favorite animal, they are cute

CORRECT: Pandas are my favorite animal. They are cute

                          OR

                    Pandas are my favorite animal; they are cute.

                        OR

                   Pandas are my favorite animal, because they are cute.

8. Avoid Run-ons and fragments

A run-on is a common mistake caused by using inappropriate punctuation at the end of a sentence. A comma splice is similar to a run-on sentence, but it uses a comma to join two clauses that have no appropriate conjunction.

RUN-ON:   My wife comes from the city and I come from the suburbs.

FRAGMENT: My wife coming from the city and I from the suburbs.

CORRECT: My wife comes from the city, and I come from the suburbs.


Prepare for your SAT exam with New Cambridge College, The best known SAT Coaching Institute in Chandigarh. They prepare you to score aces in your SATs and get admission to the university of your desire. Know these error types to prepare for SAT.

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